Category Archives: Redding

Report: How to Make Downtown Redding More Walkable

The May 1 workshop, Best Foot Forward: Downtown Redding was a wonderful opportunity to gather people from across the community to discuss opportunities and solutions that could make a real difference in our community.

The California Walks and SafeTREC team developed a report to synthesize the conversations and recommendations.  We want to share the report with you.  It’s available here:

Report – Recommendations to Improve Pedestrian Safety in Downtown Redding

Workshop Presentation – Working Toward a Safe, Vibrant and Walkable Community

Redding Injury & Collision Data –  Data for Redding

California Pedestrian Injury Data – California Injuries Data

The City of Redding was identified as a focus community for a Community Pedestrian Safety Training, in collaboration with Shasta Living Streets, based on resident interest in pedestrian safety and walkability, as well as recent and planned active transportation improvements in and around the downtown core.

Summary of the May 1 Workshop

Redding community members requested a workshop to 1) provide City staff, community organizations, and residents with a toolkit for promoting pedestrian safety and walkability to inform future comprehensive active transportation planning and improvement efforts; 2) foster an open and collaborative relationship between community groups, residents, and City agencies; and 3) develop consensus for pedestrian safety priorities and actionable next steps in downtown Redding.

The workshop was attended by 25 individuals representing a wide range of organizations and disciplines, as well as the community-at-large, including:

  • Francie Sullivan, Mayor, City of Redding
  • Missy McArthur, Vice Mayor, City of Redding; Board Member, Shasta Regional Transportation Agency; Redding Area Bus Authority Representative
  • Kristen Schreder, Council Member, City of Redding; Board Member, Shasta Regional Transportation Agency
  • Redding Department of Public Works
  • Redding Police Department
  • Downtown Redding Property Owners
  • Downtown Redding Transportation Planning Consultants
  • Shasta Living Streets
  • Shasta County Department of Public Works
  • Shasta County Regional Transportation Agency
  • Shasta County Public Health / Healthy Shasta
  • Shasta County Safe Routes to School Program
  • Caltrans District 2
  • Caltrans Headquarters
  • Shasta Historical Society
  • Downtown Business Owners
  • Developers
  • Trilogy Architecture
  • Community Residents

Participant Recommendations

The group reached broad consensus on the following recommendations:

Establish Pedestrian-Friendly Speeds through Traffic Signal Timing:   Participants unanimously agreed that traffic speeds in downtown Redding needed to be re-evaluated and retimed in order to achieve lower, pedestrian-friendly speeds (between 23-25 MPH)—particularly for California, Market, and Pine streets.

Create Safer Intersections with Curb Extensions & Pedestrian Signal Adjustments:   Participants identified several low-cost priority strategies to improve safety for people walking and crossing at intersections, including: building curb extensions—including temporary ones—to reduce crossing distances and slow turning vehicles; improving pedestrian signal timing with automatic pedestrian recall adjustments and leading pedestrian intervals at peak hours at downtown intersections; and adopting a “daylighting” policy to restrict parking at intersections and near crosswalks. Participants supported temporary curb extensions that could be rolled out in the near-term to achieve significant pedestrian safety gains, with Market/Placer, Placer/California, and Pine/Yuba as high-need initial installation sites. Participants noted, however, that the City should also plan for the systematic conversion of any temporary curb extensions to permanent concrete curb extensions in the future.

Ensure Market Street Remains a Pedestrian-Priority Street: Participants broadly supported re- opening Market Street to vehicles with the caveat that Market Street must remain a pedestrian- priority street. Participants identified extremely low vehicle speeds (15 MPH or less) and providing pedestrian-scale amenities (seating, shade, etc.) as key strategies for maintaining Market Street’s commitment to being a pedestrian-oriented space. One group suggested opening cross streets across the Promenade as an alternative approach to re-establishing vehicle traffic on Market Street itself.

Provide Shade throughout Downtown:  Participants identified the lack of shade as a large barrier for people walking and recommended that the City systematically plant additional shade trees and/or install shade structures throughout downtown and especially for the Market Street Promenade.

Explore Options for Downtown Parking Policy:  Participants expressed interest in working with the City to reexamine the downtown area’s parking policy in order to encourage increased turnover through strategies such as variable pricing of on- and off-street parking; creation of a parking benefits district where collected parking fees would be reinvested in streetscape and safety improvements in the area where the fees are collected; and the establishment of a “park once” strategy for downtown.

Improve Downtown Walkability through Parklets, Wayfinding, & Lighting:   Participants identified several strategies to improve downtown’s walkability, including exploring the establishment of temporary, voluntary “parklet” program; installing additional pedestrian-scale lighting; implementing pedestrian-scale wayfinding and signage throughout the downtown area; and improving the lighting and/or painting the ceiling of the central parking garage white to encourage more utilization of off-street parking as a park-once district strategy in the short- term.

MORE INFORMATION — See the report for an overview of safety conditions in downtown, complete input by the group, recommendations by the California Walks and SafeTREC team – and a complete list of all the people, businesses and organizations who contributed to this workshop and report.

Thank You to the many participants who gave their time, energy and expertise for this project.   Thank You to the workshop presenters and facilitators:  The California Walks and SafeTREC team and Cheryl Brinkman from San Francisco MTA.  

And a very special Thank You! to Shasta Living Streets members, business sponsors and supporters whose contributions make projects like this possible.   Thank You to the Northern C’s Cal Alumni Club our community partner for this project.

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Lassen foothills cycling adventure for everyone, Saturday, October 10

pressphoto5_ShastaWheelmenRide in the foothills of Mt Lassen along country roads in oak woodlands, open meadows, and ponderosa pine and cedar forests.

October 10, 2015

Conquer one of the most challenging Super Centuries in the West.

Spectacular climbing, descents, and beauty that thrill seekers rave about.   Last year twenty riders set out and six of them finished. A joyful 120 miles and only 4 stop signs.

Choose your Lassen Foothills adventure.

Adventure Challenges for the elite rider:  63103, or 126 miles. Short and Sweet for families and fun:  26 or 41 miles.

Enjoy delicious food and friendly service.

Helpful volunteers, full sag support with radio communication, rest stops with tasty food. Your after-ride dinner prepared to order by Fresh Fire Grill hot meals, cold salads, fresh, organic.  Party includes local music, beer and wine.

Support better bikeways, greenways and trails.

Proceeds from your ride benefit the programs Shasta Living Streets and and Shasta Wheelmen.

Be Inspired by Big Bike Weekend and the beauty of Shasta County.

The Jamboree is part of a three-day series of events.  Invite your friends to come visit – Stay the weekend and explore!  More info: Bike Bike Weekend

Register Now!

MORE INFORMATION

The Shasta Wheelmen and ShastaLivingStreets have joined forces to deliver a premier cycling event and offer you a wonderful weekend of cycling adventure.

This year riders will have a chance to meet and ride with former National Champion Remi Mcmanus.   Read about Remi:  Peloton Magazine interview.

A short video shares with photos and rider descriptions shares information about the rides – watch here:  Shasta Jamboree Video

This ride review from 2014 describes one riders experience with the Super Century:  A beautifully, painful fall Shasta County day, Santa Rosa Press Democrat.

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Visit Redding 2014 Logo

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FreshFire_SLS

3Dsnacks and lunchFull sag support, rest, snack and lunch stops.

 

RIDE DESCRIPTIONS

The GIVE ME WINGS Super Century (126 miles)  Are you up to the challenge?  Few professional-level routes can beat what this ride offers in climbing, descents and spectacular beauty.  Climb to the base of an extinct volcano, fast descent into the remote Manton Valley.  Ride through rangeland and thick forest, over streams. The final descent is unequaled. Total vertical gain is about 12,000 feet. Ride starts from 5:30 a.m.

The Lassen Foothills Century (102 miles)  One of the most challenging Century rides in California. Travel a circular route in the shadow of Mt. Lassen from the plains, up steep mountain roads to Oak Run, Buzzard Roost and the Phillips summit. Total vertical gain is about 9400 feet. Five rest stops, with lunch at 50 mi. Ride start from 6:00 a.m.

The Ponderosa Ride (63 miles)  Ride rolling hills, climb Whitmore Road to Ponderosa with scenic forests of oak, pine and cedar to 3030 ft, then a fast downhill with no need for braking. Total vertical gain is about 4300 feet.  Ride starts from 7:00 a.m.

Ash Creek Ride (41 miles)  This route includes gently rolling hills and wide vistas and adds a ride along the spectacular rock wall fences built in the oak woodlands. A deliciously smooth descent on the return.   Rest stops at 5 miles and 22 miles. Ride starts from 8:00 a.m.  

Millville Plains Ride (26 miles)  The route takes you on gently rolling hills crossing Cow Creek a few times. You will pass ranches and farms and travel along roads shaded by massive oak trees and onto the Millville Plains Road with spectacular wide vistas of surrounding mountains. Rest stop at 11 miles. Ride starts from 8:30 a.m.

Detailed route information at shastawheelmen.org

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Family Bicycling Day Downtown Redding, Sunday May 3

Embrace Downtown Redding with a Trail through the City

STREETS ALIVE!  Family Bicycling Day California Street, Downtown Redding

Sunday May 3, 9:00 – 4:00 

streetsalive_small_credit RecSearchlight

Love your Family.  Love your downtown.  Love your bike.   It’s an event unlike any other.

BRINGING SMILES AND NEW PERSPECTIVE  On this day a stretch of downtown Redding is transformed into a car-free zone for Sunday enjoyment.  Family, friends and neighbors meet and experience downtown in a new way.   Area residents learn about businesses and neighborhood attractions previously unexplored.  People see their downtown district from a new perspective.

This is an “inside-out parade,” where people themselves are the parade, participating in activities and enjoying a walk or ride on a beautiful spring Sunday – local restaurants and shops are the attractions.

Families and friends walk, bicycle or skate the short distance from nearby neighborhoods or the River Trail.   Local businesses produce open-house promotional events showcasing what’s great about downtown.

Come out and celebrate what’s best about our community, supporting business and enjoying our beautiful city.

It’s a free-form parade where everyone participates.  And it’s not just for bicycles!   The open-street makes it fun and safe to walk, skip, skate, dance and bicycle along California Street.

COMMUNITY TOGETHER  Thank you! to our generous sponsors

 

DOWNTOWN BUSINESSES JOIN THE CELEBRATION  

Where can I get tasty food and drink?  Good Question!

Where can I shop?   So many options!

A FEW OF THE ACTIVITIES ALONG THIS TRAIL THROUGH THE CITY

  • Music staged along the route.
  • Downtown Businesses are Open! Local shops, cafes, clothing stores and restaurants will all be open on this special Sunday.
  • Foundry Square Activity Zone. The businesses in Foundry Square invite you to stop by! Enjoy the Porch-on-the-Parade all day at the California Street Shop
  • North State Studios. Stop by the studio and see recent work by Nigel Skeet and other local artists.
  • Pedicab rides!
  • Bicycle Repair Station. Free.  Has your bicycle been in the garage for too long?  Stop by for a quick tune-up and repair by professionals from Village Cycle.
  • RABA Bike-on-Bus demos.  Stop by and try out the bike rack and get a feel for how easy it is to take your bike on the bus.
  • Freedom From Training Wheels course. For young children and parents. Bicycles and helmets for use by children who did not bring their own.
  • Bicycle Decoration Station and Girls Bicycle Parade. By Girls Inc.  Stop by the decoration station to add a little bling to your ride. The girls will parade along the route at noon.
  • Survey & Raffle. Give us your thoughts about how to build better bikeways – on a short survey. We  share the data with local transportation officials to help inform downtown improvements.
  • Bicycle Blender. Ride a bicycle and make a smoothie! by Healthy Shasta.
  • BMX demos. Ride like you’re invisible, not invincible. At 11am and 2pm.
  • Downtown Redding Historical photos and information.  Ask the friendly historians from the Shasta Historical Society
  • Longboard demo and parade, by Board Mart
  • Tails of Rescue, kittens and dogs in Library Park
  • Trinity Alps Chamber Players – Spring Preview Concert. Free  Shasta Arts Council, Old City Hall 2:00 p.m. – 3:30p.m.
  • Mix 101, Live Radio broadcast at Foundry Square

WOULD YOU LIKE TO ADD AN ACTIVITY?  For questions or more information contact Event Director :  Anne Thomas

MORE INFORMATION – Click Here

Further Refinements to California Street

When the California Street right-sizing was initially completed,  a large empty area was left on the east side of California Street to the left of the yellow line. We felt this was a less than optimal choice, because we were concerned the wide, empty area would be used as a travel lane or encourage speeding.

Happily. Caltrans recently returned and striped about a dozen on-street parking spaces along the east side of California Street. In addition to adding to downtown Redding’s already generous parking capacity, this has the effect of calming traffic: parked vehicles prevent motorists from using the area as an additional travel lane, the parked vehicles act as a buffer between traveling vehicles and pedestrians on the sidewalk, and the act of on-street parking discourages other motorists from speeding.

This is a win-win: more parking for motorists and safer streets for everyone!

More Refinements on the Way

A process is currently underway to develop a plan for Parking, Circulation, and Transportation in Downtown Redding.   Share your thoughts on these important community development issues:  contact information here –  Downtown Redding Transportation Plan

Mark your Calendar!  The first Community Workshop will be Wednesday, March 25 from 5:30 – 7:30 pm, in the Atrium at the south end of the Market Street Promenade.   We hope you can attend this workshop to learn more about planning activities – and ways you can provide your input and ideas for improvements to downtown transportation.  Your voice counts.

Want to learn a little more about the history and development of Downtown Redding?   From the beginning of Redding’s history until today, it’s fascinating!  View it here:  Downtown Redding: A Timeline

Join Us – MarchFourth at the Cascade March 8th!

Join us for a great show that supports Redding’s downtown theatre district and our local community!  

Sunday March 8th at the Cascade Theatre
MARCH FOURTH MARCHING BAND 
Purchase tickets:  Cascade Theatre or call 530-243-8877

For a taste of the fun, check out the 30 second video.

 This show is presented by Shasta Living Streets, partial proceeds benefit our programs.  Get your tickets soon — this is a popular band and shows regularly sell out.  Purchase tickets:  Cascade Theatre.

M4 live 2March Fourth Marching Band is something special, a kaleidoscope of musical and visual energy that inspires the audience to experience ”JoyNow!” in an atmosphere of celebration.

M4_600X200This show is a big band experience not to be missed! The 5-piece percussion corps and 6-part brass section plus funky electric bass will take you on a journey from the swamps of Louisiana to the gypsy camps of eastern Europe to the African jungle by way of Brazil,

m4 live 3

echoing the deepest grooves of American funk, rock, and jazz then boiling it all together in cinematic fashion with high-stepping stilt-acrobatics and dazzling dancers.

What began as a Fat Tuesday party in Portland on March 4th 2003 appeals to audiences of all ages and musical tastes, and has become one of the nation’s best live touring acts.

MarchFourth on March 8th – four days after their birthday!  Join us for a fun event inside on a Sunday night – to celebrate being outside and programs for active living in our region!

More information about M4

Jon M4

Partial proceeds from this show benefit Shasta Living Streets programs to build better bikeways, trails and walkable cities in our region.

Photo:  Jon after the show in Chico, heading out on tour sporting a shirt with a nice message.

 

4 # collage f4 Pounds of Lightning!

Part gypsy, part whimsy, part rock, and all fun, 4 Pounds of Lightning offers up music to make you dance! 

 Special performance by local band – 4 Pounds of Lightning will open the show. This is the most recent project of multi-talented local musician Taylor Aglipay who spent the last decade touring with MarchFourth. Taylor was raised in Trinity County and is joined by his longtime friends and fellow Trinity County natives, Nathaniel Gravette, Danyel Aglipay, and Stevo Cantrell.

 

 

Learning from the past to build a bright future

DOWNTOWN REDDING: A TIMELINE

Take a minute to click through this timeline for a fascinating review of growth, destruction and renewal of Downtown Redding.  

Click here:  Downtown Timeline

As historian David McCullough so succinctly put it, “History is who we are and why we are the way we are.”

What better way to understand the present and future of Redding than by looking at its past?  To that end, we’ve put together a brief timeline of what we consider to be key events in the history of Redding’s development.

Yes, hindsight is always 20/20, but that’s not a bad thing.  By studying the past we can build a brighter future.

– Thank you to Michael Kuker for research and production of this timeline and to the Shasta Historical Society for use of their research library and historic photos.

DOWNTOWN REDDING IS ON THE MOVE!

A process is currently underway to develop a plan for Parking, Circulation, and Transportation in Downtown Redding.   Share your thoughts on these important community development issues:  contact information here –  Downtown Redding Transportation Plan

The second Community Workshop will be in September, TBA.

A Short History of Downtown Redding Development.  Want to learn a little more about the history and development of Downtown Redding?   From the beginning of Redding’s history until today, it’s fascinating!  View it here:  Downtown Redding: A Timeline

There are many things to celebrate about the recent street improvements in Downtown Redding:

It’s not just about the bike lanes.  This project benefits pedestrians, drivers, businesses, and property owners too.

Downtown is more comfortable for people walking.  Everyone walks.  Every trip downtown begins and ends with walking. This is why the most important thing to do to create a vibrant downtown is to make it comfortable, convenient, and downright fun to walk!   California Street is much easier for people to walk across now and. calmer traffic on Pine makes people feel more comfortable walking along the sidewalk.

Improvements created calmer traffic that businesses and residents have hoped for and is in the general plan.  Drivers behave more predictably as they drive through downtown.  Far fewer erratic lane changes, less speeding.

This project conforms to recommendations from the Downtown Specific Plan as well as the 2000=2020 General Plan regarding bicycle facilities, circulation, and linkages between downtown and other areas.

Calmer street traffic creates better visibility for businesses.  Business owners like calmer street traffic; it’s easier for people to notice their businesses as they drive by.

Better for people parking and getting in and out of cars.  Businesses have already commented that customers are finding it easier see to park, enter, and exit their cars.  The buffer lane gives people space to open their doors and get in/out  safely without disturbing passing cars.

Improved flow for driving.  Drivers report the changes to California Street have improved the ease of driving from California Street through the intersection with Cypress Avenue, and/or South Market Street.

Better turn lanes on California.  California Street has better turn lanes, especially noticeable at Placer Street. The improvements are especially noticeable for turning by trucks.

No added cost: it’s all just paint.  The asphalt and striping project was already planned and budgeted. The changes to striping have added a minimal amount of extra cost for paint.

It was a highway, and now we don’t need a highway downtown.  The streets were originally configured for traffic that is no longer there. Prior to this project, the streets had not changed since they were part of Highway 99, the primary north/south highway through the state before I-5. Traffic on California Street has dropped 27% from 2002 to 2012. Traffic on Pine Street has dropped nearly 20% during the same time.  We heard a business owner say:  We have six lanes of traffic moving through Redding along I-5; we don’t need that downtown!

Peak traffic is only 40 minutes per day, 5 days a week.  Living Streets are used by everyone. Peak auto traffic might exist for 40 minutes a day for 5 days a week or less, but people move, work, and live on these streets for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!

It’s safe.  The projects are expected to decrease accidents for pedestrians, cyclists, and motorists.   Studies of similar traffic calming and bicycle lanes show reduced crashes and increased safety.

Increase retail sales and raise property values.  Studies of similar traffic calming and bicycle lanes show increases in retail sales.

It sets the stage for the future of Downtown Redding.     Caltrans will be monitoring results and considering further improvements to be made in five years.

Results from these improvements will inform the planning efforts underway now to build a better future for a vibrant downtown.

We are grateful to Caltrans District 2 and the City of Redding for making these improvements to benefit businesses and our community.

keepcalm_caltrans2

 

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URGENT Call to Action: Rightsizing on California Street

An article (subscription required) in Saturday’s Record-Searchlight makes it clear that there is still discussion about whether 2 lanes for auto traffic with the addition of a Better Bikeway would better serve downtown businesses and local families than the current configuration of three lanes for auto traffic only.

As Caltrans talks bikes lanes in downtown Redding, push to reduce lanes on California St. emerges. … “discussion on Wednesday is shaping up to be over whether the less-congested California Street should be reduced from three lanes to two.”   Your voice is necessary to make a difference.  Please send your input—it’s easy!  Here’s why we feel these improvements are so essential:

  • This is a rare opportunity to improve the flow of movement in downtown Redding in the immediate future.
  • It would be the first step to replacing the aging highway conditions in downtown Redding and building an urban avenue featuring better bikeways, greenways, and improved crosswalks.
  • It would improve the movement and connections between the Westside neighborhoods (and important upcoming improvements there) and the Promenade and Pine Street areas.
  • It would provide the opportunity for a Better Bikeway connecting the popular Sacramento River Trail to downtown businesses. This would keep bicycle travel out of the dangerous “door zone” and separated from auto traffic.
  • It will make downtown walking safer and more convenient and improve the foot traffic that is essential for healthy businesses.
  • It will calm traffic moving through downtown without causing congestion.
  • It aligns to improvements that are planned in the longer term.
  • It is the type of improvement called for in the current General Plan.
  • Its a great opportunity to do more with less:  Less cost to the taxpayer and bigger benefits to businesses and families.

This is exactly the kind of real change that will boost the viability of downtown by helping make downtown Redding a place people want to be.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

We need you to email the Caltrans District 2 Public Information Office at d2pio@dot.ca.gov RIGHT NOW and tell them you support rightsizing California Street to two lanes and adding a buffered bikeway.  Get your friends and family to email as well!  We don’t have much time, Caltrans will be making their decision this Wednesday, May 28.  Make no mistake –  this improvement will not happen without strong public support.

Caltrans and the City of Redding have been tremendous supporters of our cause and have been eager to listen to our suggestions; that’s why it’s absolutely critical that we show there is a demand for this kind of quality downtown boulevard and bicycling facility in Redding.

Here’s a suggestion for what you can say:

I support rightsizing of California Street with two lanes for auto traffic and a Better Bikeway on California Street.  I think this is a good idea for downtown business and local families because [choose any of the benefits outlined above and add your own].  I am a [business owner, parent, professional ….] and I thank Caltrans and the City of Redding for your willingness to make these improvements in the near team to support the health and vitality of downtown Redding which will benefit local businesses, families and our regional economy.”

This is our chance to make a huge difference in the walkability and bikeability of downtown Redding in the near term.  We need your help!

What might California Street look like?

The proposed restriping of California Street.
The potential restriping of California Street.

Caltrans will be making a pavement overlay on California Street in downtown Redding this summer as part of $3 million dollar project.  There is potential to rightsize California Street to two lanes and add a Better Bikeway with buffers along the bike lane—providing safer movement for all users of the roadway.

Our Analysis

Why should we rightsize the lanes on California Street?

Road diets result in safer streets for motorists, pedestrians, and cyclists. Researchers have found that road diets can be expected to reduce overall crash frequency by anywhere from 19% to 43%, with the higher crash reductions occurring in small urban areas than in metropolitan areas. A recent rightsizing of a one-way NYC street from three lanes to two resulted in a reduction of the percentage of vehicles on the street breaking the speed limit from 74% to 20% and the percentage of cyclists riding on the sidewalk decreased from 46% to 3%.

If California Street were rightsized, pedestrians would have one less lane of motor traffic to cross, motorists would be less prone to switch from lane to lane erratically, and there would be more room for cyclists.

The difference a road diet will make in the street life of California Street is incalculable. Peak traffic might exist for 30 minutes a day for 5 days a week or less, but people move on these streets for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Won’t going from three lanes to two increase congestion?

No. The FHA has determined that road diets do not cause congestion on roads that carry under 20,000 ADTS (Average Daily Trips). California Street carried an estimated 9,200 ADTS in 2012.  That’s maybe 1/3 more than Parkview Avenue carried that year.  Parkview Avenue recently rightsized to 1 lane in each direction—noticed any congestion on Parkview lately? Neither have we.

In discussing road diets, the FHA states:   “It has been shown that roads with 15,000 ADT or less had very good results in the areas of safety, operations, and livability.”

Furthermore, the data shows automobile traffic for California Street has been trending downwards over recent years, reflecting the national trend for less driving overall.

Shouldn’t we just leave the streets alone? They’ve been fine like this for a long time.

No, they haven’t been fine.

The streets are currently designed to move the maximum amount of traffic through downtown at a high amount of speed.  This makes downtown more unpleasant and uncomfortable for pedestrians and bicyclists, and is bad for business.

The current general plan, in place for many years, makes clear that this type of goal has drawbacks for local business and calls for changes like the one now being discussed: “moving traffic through Downtown without delay detracts from efforts to establish an active, pedestrian-friendly area” and the plan allows for “‘tolerable delays’ for the Downtown area where vitality, activity, and pedestrian and transit use are primary goals.” The plan has a stated policy to “restrict speed limits in residential neighborhoods, Downtown, and other areas of the City where pedestrian activities are strongly encouraged to reduce the potential for pedestrian injuries and fatalities.”

If we rightsized California Street, what would we do with all that space?

Glad you asked! We’re like to see a buffered bikeway! After all, the City of Redding 2000-2020 General Plan has a stated goal of making it easier and safer for people to travel by bicycle, to be effected by “incorporat[ing] facilities suitable for bicycle use in the design of interchanges, intersections, and other street-improvement/maintenance projects. ”  This type of Better Bikeway can easily be implemented within the limited scope of the current overlay project.

What’s a buffered bikeway?

NACTO (National Association of City Transportation Officials) defines a buffered bikeway as “conventional bicycle lanes paired with a designated buffer space separating the bicycle lane from the adjacent motor vehicle travel lane and/or parking lane.” Simply put, it’s a normal bike lane with a little extra space just like the image at the top of this post.

Is a buffered bikeway on California Street a good idea?

YES. Yes, yes, unequivocally, yes!

It’s good for business: 

    • Portland State University researchers found that customers who arrive by bike spend 24% more per month than those who arrive by car.

    • Traveling by bike encourages more frequent stops than a car. In a study of Toronto merchants, patrons arriving by foot and bicycle visit the most often and spend the most money per month.

    • New York City found that protected green lanes had a significant positive impact on local business strength. After the construction of a protected bike lane on 9th Avenue, local businesses saw a 49 percent increase in retail sales. In comparison, local businesses throughout Manhattan only saw a 3 percent increase in retail sales.

It’s good for everyone:

    • Even drivers who never ride bikes themselves overwhelmingly report greater comfort around physically separated bike lanes.

    • After Chicago’s Kinzie Street green lane was installed, a travel time study found little to no effect on automobile traffic: – Eastbound morning rush hour travel time from Milwaukee Avenue to Wells Street increased by less than one minute. – Westbound morning rush hour travel times from Wells Street to Milwaukee Avenue slightly improved. – Evening rush hour travel time in both directions slightly improved.

    • After New York City installed a protected green bike lane on Columbus Avenue, bicycling increased 56% on weekdays, crashes decreased 34%, speeding decreased, sidewalk riding decreased, traffic flow remained similar, and commercial loading hours/space increased 475%

If you build it, people will ride:

    • After buffered green lanes were installed on Philadelphia’s Spruce and Pine streets, bike traffic increased 95% and the number of bicyclists riding on the sidewalks decreased by up to 75%
    • After a green lane was installed on Chicago’s Kinzie Street: Bicycle ridership on increased 55 percent, according to morning rush hour counts; Forty-one percent of respondents changed their usual route to take advantage of the new protected green lane.

    • NYC’s Prospect Park West protected green lane saw a 190 percent increase in weekday ridership, with 32 percent of those biking under age 12.

It’s what people want:

    • 94% of respondents to a recent Shasta Living Streets survey agreed or strongly agreed that if there were better bicycle (like buffered or protected bike lanes) facilities and pedestrian facilities in town, they would ride their bicycle or walk more often.
    • 93% of respondents to a recent Shasta Living Streets survey agreed or strongly agreed that a buffered or protected bike lane would make them feel more comfortable riding their bicycle on city streets.
    • Nearly two-thirds (65%) of Americans who don’t bicycle say they would like to ride more often.

Citations for these and many more statistics can be found at People for Bikes’ website.

Why should my tax money be used on a bicycle lane?

  • Most bicyclists also own a car and pay taxes and registration like everyone else.
  • In 2008, Governor Schwarzenegger signed legislation that requires cities and counties, when updating the part of a local general plan that addresses roadways and traffic flows, to ensure that those plans account for the needs of all roadway users—not just motorists.
  • More people on bicycles means less auto traffic for the remaining motorists on the road, and it reduces city costs for maintaining roads since bicycles do not cause the same wear and tear on road surfaces as heavier cars and trucks.

Is this an ambitious enough proposal?

This is just an overlay project and has a very limited budget and scope. A buffered bikeway can be put into place with just a few gallons of paint. Any more significant changes to downtown circulation would be more expensive and would have to wait for a future project. In this case, the perfect is the enemy of the good and we should applaud Caltrans and the City of Redding for attempting to do more with less!

 

Bike To Happy Hour For A Bike Commute Festival

Do you sometimes enjoy biking to work?  Thinking about it but need some encouragement?

Join us for Happy Hour and the Bike Commute Festival on Friday. Please join us whether you ride on this day or not ….  Come meet people who ride locally and swap ideas, tips and stories.  Learn about programs and how you can get involved in the movement to create better bikeways and walkable cities and towns in our region.

THANK YOU to our sponsors – Realtor, Rick PhillipsCarnegie’s, and Redding Distributing Company.

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And enjoy Shasta Living Streets Better Bikeway Brew, a blond ale from Deschutes Brewery!

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Our beer celebrates the Better Bikeways Campaign for Shasta County.  Photos available on Instagram:  Better Bikeways Photos

Then – Later that evening, head over to the  Bike-In Movie in the Downtown Promenade.  At about 8:30pm.    More information:  FREE Bike-in Movie Night

Klunkerz: A Film About Mountain Bikes – documents mountain bike history during its formative years in Northern California and examines the relationships of the Marin County teens, athletes, and entrepreneurs who were directly responsible for popularizing off-road cycling. The film includes many interviews with those present during the embryonic stages of the sport, including Gary Fisher, Charlie Kelly, Joe Breeze, Tom Ritchey, Mike Sinyard, and Otis Guy, and covers “the treacherous old Repack races.”

The film was written, produced, and directed by independent California filmmaker Billy Savage and released on October 8, 2006.

movie trailer

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0sjRCzRrPac

Wear your ten gallon hat and ride your zero gallon bike! We ride too!

Extroverts welcome.   

Join friends from Shasta Living Streets and The Shasta Wheelman as we ride in the parade to help our community understand that we ride too!   Help spread the word about people on bicycles in our community and enjoy the beautiful day and riding in the parade – it’s really fun!

Yep, We ride too!  

Jack as DodgeCarr

Saturday, May 17th, 2014.  Meet on California Street between Shasta and Eureka Way at 8:30 am.

We are Parade # 126, Staging 09.

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More information about the parade:  Parade Map,  Asphalt Cowboys